Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Brain changes related to intense remedial reading programs

Remedial reading programs are common - but I don't think there as intensive as this paper published in Neuron ...
White Matter and Reading in Children - Health Blog - WSJ

... Researchers found that kids who were weak readers fared poorly on a common measure of white matter in a key region of the brain. But after 100 hours of intensive reading instruction, the kids showed significant improvement in white matter (and in reading). Similar children who didn’t get the intensive instruction didn’t show improvement. The study included 47 weak readers and 25 strong readers, and the kids were between ages 8 and 12...
The abstract doesn't tell us much about the reading program, and the full text article is not freely available at this time. I'd love to know what program they used.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

I would love to know too! The only thing is, with a child that has multiple areas of difficulty and is prescribed an intensive intervention for each area, everyone quickly runs out of energy, time, and money. But then we load up on guilt that we didn't do everything possible.

Does the abstract say what the magnitude of the effect of this intervention was? 100 hours of intensive reading intervention produced on average how much improvement? (and what variation underlying this average)?

John Gordon said...

I so know what you mean. There are a million possible interventions -- and we can only do a thousand or so.

The abstract had very little information. There's a chance I'll pick up the article when I'm next at the U, but that's 50/50 at best.